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Australians buying three times more batteries in response to energy price hikes

April 18, 2018 9:56 am Published by Leave your thoughts

Household battery demand has trebled since last year, as Australians take matters into their own hands to protect themselves against energy price hikes.

A new report by solar energy consultancy, SunWiz, shows almost 21,000 energy storage systems were installed in Australia in 2017, a three-fold increase on the year before.

SunWiz says 12 per cent of the 172,000 solar panel installations in 2017 included a battery, up from six per cent in 2016, with analysts predicting the white-hot PV market is likely to persist to the end of the year.

“Sales in household batteries have skyrocketed this year, with demand outstripping the availability of installers in many areas,” said Warwick Johnston, SunWiz founder.

“With energy prices rising this year, Australians are embracing the idea of being able to control their energy consumption and costs while reducing their emissions at the same time.

“State policies are certainly influencing uptake as well and will continue to do so. We’ve seen interesting developments in SA where subsidising tens of thousands of battery installations became bipartisan policy. I’d expect to see this emerge as a pattern across the country considering the popularity of batteries and the benefits they contribute to the electricity network.”

In total, 135MWh of projects were installed in 2017, plus 190MWh of distributed systems.

New South Wales was the number one battery hotspot in the country in 2017, claiming 42 per cent of installations. Queensland was a close second with 19 per cent, followed by Victoria

(17 per cent).

ROI continues to be best in South Australia, where a seven-year payback is achievable for an average battery customer. The average payback for customers in other states is 10-years or more.

Key forecasts for 2018-19:

A full copy of the report are available to download here.

 For media interviews with Warwick Johnston from SunWiz, please contact: Liz Stephens on 0407 224469 or at liz@climatemediacentre.org.au